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Natural Inquirer Water Articles

 

 

 

Below is a list we have compiled of all articles relating to water that have been published in Natural Inquirer journals. Please click on the title of the article to download a PDF file of the article.

Full Throttle Model (Time Warp Monograph Series): This article highlights research on the Great Lakes that uses scientific models to quickly asses watershed health for restoration prioritization.

Whitewater Rafting Measures Up!: This article looks at the value of guided rafting trips on southern rivers. You can find this article in the Spring '99 Natural Inquirer.

Go With the Flow: Are mountain stream channels shaped by flood and drought? Read this article to find out! You can find this article in the Rocky Mountain Natural Inquirer.

Should Ditches be Graded?: This article looks at how soil erosion may occur in watersheds from storm water runoff. You can find this article in the Olympic Winter Games Natural Inquirer.

Big Fish in a Small Pool: This article looks at habitat preferences of cutthroat trout. You can find this article in the Olympic Winter Games Natural Inquirer.

Swimming Upstream Without a Ladder: In this article, scientists conducted research to learn if dams and pipes affect river shrimp movements in a tropical stream in Puerto Rico. You can find this article in the Tropical edition Natural Inquirer.

Do What You Water: This article looks at the current situation and possible future of fresh water in the United States. You can find this article in the Facts to the Future edition Natural Inquirer.

One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, No Fish?: Learn how scientists investigate the current situation and possible future of aquatic animals in the United States. You can find this article in the Facts to the Future Natural Inquirer.

Moving Spore-adically: In this article, scientists investigate the spread of sudden oak death in California forests. Spores are spread by multiple ways, including rainwater and streams. You can find this article in the Invasive Species Natural Inquirer.

Toad-ally Awesome: This articles explains how scientists are investigating the relationship between flooding, summer rains, and toad reproduction along the Rio Grande. You can find this article in the Ecosystem Services Natural Inquirer.

What Goes Around Comes Around: Learn how long term weather patterns affect plants in Carolina Bay wetlands. You can find this article in the Ecosystem Services Natural Inquirer.

Fill Those Potholes: In this article, scientists conduct research to identify ecosystem services of small wetlands on the American prairie. You can find this article in the Ecosystem Services Natural Inquirer.

Woolly Bully: This monograph explores how the hemlock woolly adelgid, a nonnative invasive insect, affects the water cycle in western North Carolina. You can find this article in the Woolly Bully Monograph.

It’s a Small World: Can oceans and the climate affect wildland fires thousands of miles away? Read this article to find out! You can find this article in the Climate Change Natural Inquirer

Did They Make The Gradient?: The scientists in this article wanted to see how climate change may affect stream temperatures in North Carolina now and into the future. You can find this article in the Climate Change Natural Inquirer.

Mangrove Mania: In this article, scientists look at how elevation change and sea-level rise affect mangrove forests in the Federated States of Micronesia. You can find this article in the Hawaii Pacific Islands Natural Inquirer.

Don’t Litter The Stream: Read about how an invasive tree species impacts a Hawaiian stream food web. You can find this article in the Hawaii Pacific Islands Natural Inquirer.

Caribbean Cruise: In this study, the scientists wanted to study a certain type of particulate organic matter (POM) called coarse particulate organic matter, or CPOM.  The scientists wanted to figure out how the amount and quality of CPOM changed over a period of time in the Luquillo Experimental Forest. You can find this in the Freshwater Natural Inquirer.

Green Means Clean: The scientists in this study were interested in conducting a national assessment of drinking water watersheds that crossed State boundaries. You can find this in the Freshwater Natural Inquirer.

Mussel Mania: Mussel shells, like growth rings from a tree, can show scientists the age and growth rate of the animal. The scientists in this study wanted to know how streamflow affected mussels and their growth. You can find this in the Freshwater Natural Inquirer.

Sediment-al Journey: Often after flooding events, chemicals are deposited in riparian areas along the waterways.  Scientists in this study wanted to find out the chemical content in these riparian sediments and what that content can tell us about how urban land is being used. You can find this in the Freshwater Natural Inquirer.

Timed Travel: Water temperature helps regulated aquatic ecosystems and for many aquatic organisms, life-cycle phases are tied to water temperature.In this study, scientists altered water temperatures to explore how water temperature affects Chinook salmon development. You can find this in the Freshwater Natural Inquirer.

Under Where?: Scientists in this study wanted to know how much soil water, compared to other sources of water, contribute to stream flow in certain areas, as well as how levels of snow fall affect ground water's contribution to stream flow.  You can find this in the Freshwater Natural Inquirer.

What's the Nonpoint?: Nonpoint source water pollution comes from large areas or landscapes such as roadways, farms, and urban and suburban communities.In this study, scientists were interested in determining how the threat from nonpoint source water pollution varies in watersheds across the United States. You can find this in the Freshwater Natural Inquirer.