Weblinks for Citizen Science Projects
Citizen science is scientific research conducted, in whole or in part, by nonprofessional or amateur scientists. Explore the projects below and get involved!
Animals

eBird: Participants follow a simple procedure for recording their birding effort and the birds they observe. Compare your data to years of historical data collected by other citizen scientists.

iNaturalist: Where you can record what you see in nature, meet other nature lovers, and learn about the natural world.

Bugwood Invasives: Real time tracking of invasive species.

Project Noah: Explore and document wildlife with citizen scientists everywhere.

The Great Sunflower Project: Collect data on pollinators in yards, gardens, schools, and parks, and learn about the importance of these pollinators.

Monarch Larva Monitoring Project: A citizen science project involving volunteers from across the United States and Canada in monarch research.

North American Butterfly Association: Count and record butterfly populations near you.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: How you can help save the Monarch Butterfly.

Project Feederwatch: A winter-long survey of birds that visit feeders at backyards, nature centers, community areas, and other locales in North America.

Nature’s Notebook: Gather information on plant and animal phenology across the U.S.

Bumble Bee Watch: A collaborative effort to track and conserve North America’s bumble bees. 

Butterflies and Moths of North America: An effort to collect, store, and share butterfly and moth information and occurrence data.

Lost Ladybug Project: Join Lost Ladybug Project to help monitor ladybugs as scientists search for how to save native ladybugs.

Monarch Watch: Help create and monitor monarch habitat at your school, home, or park. 

Odonata Central: Generate maps, checklists, and accompanying data for dragonflies and damselflies worldwide.

Frogwatch USA: A citizen science program that provides individuals, groups, and families with an opportunity to learn about wetlands in their communities and report data on the calls of local frogs and toads.

Plants

Bugwood Invasives: Real time tracking of invasive species.

iNaturalist: Where you can record what you see in nature, meet other nature lovers, and learn about the natural world.

Project Budburst: A national network of citizen scientists monitoring plants as the seasons change.

Nature’s Notebook: Gather information on plant and animal phenology across the U.S.

Project Noah: Explore and document wildlife with citizen scientists everywhere.

Weather, Water & Air Quality

Secchi Disk: Help study the health of marine phytoplankton.

Let There Be Night: A local response to a global issue. Students assess the quality of the night sky in their community and share their findings.

Creek Watch: An iPhone application that enables you to help monitor the health of your local watershed. 

Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, & Snow Network: Volunteers of all ages and backgrounds work together to measure and map precipitation (rain, hail and snow).

mPing: NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory is collecting public weather reports through a free app available for smart phones or mobile devices. 

EPA Volunteer Water Monitoring: Across the country, trained volunteers are monitoring the condition of their local streams, lakes, estuaries and wetlands.

World Water Monitoring Challenge: An international education and outreach program that builds public awareness and involvement in protecting water resources around the world by engaging citizens to conduct basic monitoring of their local water bodies.

Leaf Pack Network: A network of citizens, teachers, and students investigating their local stream ecosystems.

National Marine Sanctuaries Six ways you can learn about national marine sanctuaries.


Natural Disasters & Geography

Did You Feel It? Contribute your experience of the earthquake and make a contribution to the scientific body of information about this earthquake.

Did You See It? Report any landslides you see to a national landslide database used by scientists.

The National Map Corps: Citizens to collect structures data by adding new features, removing obsolete points, and correcting existing data for The National Map database.

 

Other:

SciGirls Connect: A PBS kids television show, website, and educational outreach that engages girls in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).